Advice for Entrepreneurs: Believe You Can, Make a Plan, Be Aggressively Positive

I just found some notes from a great speech from Dr. Angeline Godwin, President of Patrick Henry Community College about teaching entrepreneurship (which is hard to do!)

Here's 5 questions to ask yourself, and a few comments from me on how I started down the road to Entrepreneurville:

1. The Bird in the Hand: What do you have right now? When I started my business, I had very few concrete things. Luckily, I wasn't selling goods, I was selling my brain, my time and my experience. I had to get a new computer, business cards and a website -- and get out there! I had connections but I need projects. I had some freelance clients, but they weren't steady. I did not have any previous business experience, but I'd worked mainly for small, growing companies which taught me a few things (mostly, what to avoid!)

2. The Affordable Loss: What are you willing to lose? I was in a very stressful work situation that required a lot of hours and freelancing seemed to be a great option. I wish I could have had a better, more stepped transition but unfortunately it didn't work out that way. So, I entered entrepreneurship by jumping into the great unknown and growing wings on the way down. Depending on what day it was, I was confident or disconsolate. Some of the uncertainty was balanced by less stress and more freedom -- but it's also incredibly hard to shake the feeling that you could ALWAYS be doing more.  

3. The Crazy Quilt: Who do you know? (who isn't like you...) I made lots of lists. People i knew locally, people from previous jobs in Cleveland, people I'd met at conferences and through work over the years. It's amazing how many people you collect -- and once I was focused on health care, it was interesting to see who I knew who might hire me that i had no work connection to. It's really a testament to ensuring you have a good all-around reputation. Many of my clients have come to me in unusual ways, through friends and colleagues and I appreciate that tremendously.

4. Lemon to Lemonade: What will you do when, not if, something goes wrong? I spent a lot of time worrying about things going wrong, even when they were going right. Being an entrepreneur will make you hyper-vigilant. It's important to have a Plan B and a Plan Z (as LinkedIn founder Reid Hoffman coined) as well as just plain faith in yourself. If you are good at what you do, if you are reliable and deliver as promised, if you can adapt to changing situations -- why can't you count on that in the future? 

5. Piloting the Plane: What do you control? Well, you can only control so much, and worrying will make you nuts. So, that's what insurance is for. I got some good advice in the beginning about setting aside half of every paycheck, and to get business insurance -- not just for liability, but for errors and omissions and other business issues that might be out of your control. You can create processes and set up policies as you learn, too, so you don't make the same mistakes twice. 

Entrepreneurship isn't for sissies. But it can be tremendously rewarding and the freedom can make you never want to work for anyone else again. I love what I do -- and I love that I have created my business to serve my clients in a way that works for them, too. Dr. Godwin also said "Be Aggressively Positive" and I think that's great advice. Believe you can do it. Make a plan to do it, and get to it!