Hospitals -- More than a Building, Part of the Community

I finally sat down to read the Community Connections publication put out by the American Hospital Association, a book full of ideas and innovations for health care leaders related to community programs around the country. The range of programs was interesting, from offering volunteer doulas to pet care during hospice to arranging for meals to be delivered home for food insecure seniors. I think that hospitals sometimes get a bad rap for their size and the amount of money they circulate in the community -- but they are often at the heart of communities in the United States in big cities and small towns.

I think that in our great cultural shift in health care we will see more partnerships and more preventive care -- both essentially important to our community health. From cultural health navigators who assist female refugees from the Middle East / Southeast Asia / Subsaharan Africa in Phoenix to training African American barbers how to measure blood pressure and serve as heart health advocates in DC -- identifying cultural barriers to health is important.

It's heartening to see things that didn't used to fall under "health" be recognized as part of our whole selves. For example, dinner programs for breast cancer support that include communications skills, nutrition, stress management, intimacy and finances, which both builds a sense of connection with the group but also recognizes that resources are needed for these challenges. A retreat for stroke survivors and their families meets similar needs in support, education and socialization.

Prevention is also more of a focus, looking to prevent falls and injuries by strengthening flexibility with exercise (Idaho), student health coaches for those with chronic conditions (Pennsylvania) and instruction for physically disabled individuals to play sports like fishing, swimming, wheelchair basketball and hand-cycling (Iowa.) A hospital in Oklahoma offers a drive-through flu shot clinic to encourage high risk patients. It's important to address the current issues while preventing future ones and there are many adaptations we can make to help keep communities healthy. I applaud hospitals for their innovation and compassion.